$5000 Photocrati Fund Grant Competition Now Open for 2014

Quick announcement from Scott

…and now for the details.

It’s our favorite time of year again.

Our team is pleased to announce that the fifth annual Photocrati Fund competition is now open. The Photocrati Fund provides a $5,000 grant to one photographer each year to help support an environmental or humanitarian photography project. At the completion of the project, the grant winner’s images will be displayed as a photo essay on Photocrati.

Past recipients of the award have covered overfishing in Chile, the conflicts surrounding conservation of endangered habitat for Stone sheep, global energy poverty, and the ongoing legacy of the 1984 Bhopal gas leak.

We believe that great imagery can still make a tremendous difference in the world, and we understand the challenges facing photographers who wish to undertake these kinds of projects. Our hope is that our upfront grant can help these important humanitarian and environmental stories get told.

The winner and top finishers are selected by a prestigious panel of some of the world’s top environmental and cultural photographers – past judges of the grant have included Michael “Nick” Nichols, Steve McCurry, Art Wolfe and Jim Brandenburg. We are so honored to have the chance to work with our esteemed panel of judges, and we especially appreciate the chance to see so many incredible projects from photographers around the globe. The 2014 judges are still being confirmed, but please stay tuned, we’ll finalize our panel soon.

Applications for the 2014 Photocrati Fund competition will be accepted from Thursday, January 30, 2013 through Friday, April 18, 2014 (11:59 p.m. Mountain Time). The grant winner will be announced at the end of June 2014.

Grant applicants should submit a one-page project statement (including a rough budget) and bio, along with a link to an online portfolio of 20-30 themed images to: fund@photocrati.com. Please put “2014 Photocrati Fund” in the subject of the email. For complete Photocrati Fund rules and guidelines please see visit the Photocrati Fund page.

To learn about Alex Masi’s winning 2013 project, Bhopal Legacy, please check out the 2013 Photocrati Fund Winner and Top Finishers blog post.

Announcing the 2013 Photocrati Fund Winner and Top Finalists

photocrati-fund

Photocrati is proud to (finally) announce the 2013 Photocrati Fund winner, top finalists, and honorable mentions. This year, more than 400 photographers applied for the grant. We feel honored to have had the chance to review their work. It is inspiring to learn about so many talented photographers engaged in meaningful humanitarian and environmental projects across the globe. From documenting child laborers in Mexico, to covering AIDS orphans in Uganda, to capturing Louisiana’s degrading coastline and bayous, applicants impressed us, and our judges, with their powerful imagery and solid applications. We are very grateful to our judges for generously continuing to support the photography community through their efforts with Photocrati: Jim Brandenburg, Michael “Nick” Nichols and Steve McCurry.

2013 PHOTOCRATI FUND RESULTS

Alex Masi – 2013 Photocrati Fund Fellow

Bhopal Legacy — Documentary photographer Alex Masi, the 2013 Photocrati Fund winner, focuses on the longterm impact of the devastating 1984 gas leak from the Union Carbide Indian Limited pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. At the time of the accident, the local government confirmed almost 4,000 deaths. By 2006, a government report showed that more than 550,000 people had suffered injuries from the gas leak, many of them resulting in paralysis. In addition to the gas cloud, toxic waste buried near the plant has leaked into the surrounding soils and aquifers and thus the drinking water. Now, thousands of people, mostly poor, suffer from neurological disorders due to this environmental contamination. With this grant, Alex intends to document the work of medical advocacy groups who work to improve the lives of “gas survivors” and to raise awareness about the plight of the people who suffer daily with little recourse for relief.

Ethan Welty – Second Place

Unprotected Cascades

Spanning the border between Washington state (US) and British Columbia (Canada),the North Cascades is an iconic mountain range that defines the region both climactically and aesthetically. Conservation photographer Ethan Welty is creating a comprehensive portrait of the range: highlighting its magnificence and biodiversity, while also raising awareness for the need to increase park boundaries. While many assume that the entire North Cascade range is protected, only 504,500 acres are part of North Cascades National Park.

Philippe Schneider

Where We Live Matters – In 2007, the United Nations reported that more than 900 million people worldwide live in slums. Philippe’s work documents the plight of slum dwellers in Paga Hill, Port Moresby (Papua New Guinea). Rapid urban development, lack of available land, and high housing costs lead many working poor to build homes in slum settlements. In May 2012, armed police destroyed the homes and structures of more than 3000 people in a forcible eviction. Humanitarian photographer Philippe Schneider works to illuminate the dignity of the human spirit in difficult conditions, and seeks to raise awareness for the complex issues surrounding urban poverty, lack of affordable housing, land tenure, and slum dwelling.

Scott Typaldos – Fourth Place

Butterflies – Humanitarian photographer Scott Typaldos explores the challenges facing people afflicted with mental health issues in Western Africa and Eastern Europe. Many facilities lack adequate funding to provide proper care. Patients are frequently shackled, left imprisoned and isolated. Scott’s work aims to highlight human rights abuses and to work toward increasing awareness of, and funding for, those suffering from mental illness in underserved areas.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Allison Shelley, Not with a Bang; But a Whimper, Kiana Hayeri, The Day I Became a Woman; Marc Ellison, Pain at Sunrise, Regrets at Sunset; Sara Lewkowicz, A Portrait of Domestic Violence; Monique Jacques, Gaza’s Girls; Sean Gallagher, Jakarta: The Sinking City; Fausto Podavini, Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam; Rafael Fabres, Pacification; Natisha Mallick, Living at the Edge of Life; Benjamin Cherry, The Importance of Natural Corridors

 

The Photocrati Fund, a $5000 grant to support an environmental or humanitarian photography project, is offered to one photographer each year. The aim is to invest in photographers who will have a long-term positive impact. Our goal is to identify outstanding, photographers and to provide the resources necessary to pursue projects that will have a tangible and positive effect on the world. The 2014 Photocrati Fund competition will begin in January 2014 and will run through April 2014. For more details please see the Photocrati Fund webpage.

 

Photocrati Fund Offers $5000 Photography Grant

photocrati-fund

It’s our favorite time of year again. Our team is pleased to announce that the fourth annual Photocrati Fund competition is now open.

The Photocrati Fund offers a $5,000 grant to one photographer each year to undertake an environmental or humanitarian photography project. At the completion of the project, the grant winner’s images will be displayed as a photo essay on Photocrati.com.

The winner and top finishers are selected by a prestigious panel of some of the world’s top environmental and cultural photographers – past judges of the grant have included Michael “Nick” Nichols, Steve McCurry, Art Wolfe and Jim Brandenburg.

We are so honored to have the chance to work with our esteemed panel of judges, and we love the chance to see so many incredible projects from photographers around the globe.

We really believe in the power of great imagery to make a difference in the world. And we are excited to be able to support one Photocrati Fund Fellow each year with a unique upfront grant. We know, from experience, how difficult it can be to secure funding and platforms for photography projects. Our fellowship is part of our commitment to help ensure that important stories get told.

Applications for the 2013 Photocrati Fund competition will be accepted from Tuesday, January 15, 2013 through Tuesday April 30, 2013 (11:59 p.m. Mountain Time). The grant winner will be announced at the end of June 2013.

Grant applicants should submit a one-page project statement (including a rough budget) and bio, along with a link to an online portfolio of 20-30 themed images to: fund@photocrati.com. Please put “2013 Photocrati Fund” in the subject of the email. For complete Photocrati Fund rules and guidelines please see visit the 2013 Photocrati Fund page at Photocrati.com.

To learn about Peter DiCampo’s winning 2012 project, Life Without Lights, please visit the 2012 Photocrati Fund blog post at Photocrati.com. To view the 2011 winner and top finishers, please visit the 2011 Photocrati Fund blog post.

 

Announcing the 2012 Photocrati Fund Winner and Top Finalists

photocrati-fund

Photocrati is proud to (finally) announce the 2012 Photocrati Fund winner and top finalists. We had an incredible pool of applicants to the fund this year. We are awed by the great imagery and the important projects. We’re also very grateful to our judges for continuing to support the photography community through their efforts with Photocrati: Jim Brandenburg, Michael “Nick” Nichols and Steve McCurry. With more than 400 applicants to the grant this year, competition was fierce and judging was a challenge.

2012 PHOTOCRATI FUND RESULTS

Peter DiCampo – 2012 Photocrati Fund Fellow
Life Without Lights — Documentary photographer Peter DiCampo, the 2012 Photocrati Fund winner, focuses on energy poverty in his on-going project Life Without Lights. Around the globe, roughly 1.5 billion people lack access to electricity; almost a billion more rely on inadequate sources. Biomass, such as charcoal and wood or trash, serves as fuel for cooking and heat. Without improved access to sustainable energy, poverty is difficult to escape.

For the next phase of his project, Peter will focus on the devastating health impacts of energy poverty in the remote Bundibugyo District of Uganda. The World Health Organization estimates that less than 10 percent of Uganda’s population has access to electricity. In remote and rural areas there is almost no electricity at all. Thick smoke from cooking fires contributes to high rates of lung disease. Clinics have no refrigeration for medicines, and no lights for nighttime births and surgeries. There are no phones to communicate emergencies.

Ami Vitale – Second Place
Kashmir: Paths to Peace – This work follows the brutal conflict in Kashmir and the relatively recent wave of unarmed protests. The work illustrates the resilience of the people: how an old culture survived a war, and how a younger, globalized generation has been shaped by the conflict.

Anna Boyiazis – Third Place
AIDS Orphans in Sub-Saharan Africa- This work highlights the devastating impact of AIDS on children and families, and the hope offered by the peer education efforts of the Jane Goodall Institute, Uganda, to ‘turn the tide of HIV’.

Laura El-Tantawy – Fourth Place
In the Shadow of the Pyramids – Tantawy explores Egypt’s identity as a nation in transition. Started in 2005, In the Shadow of the Pyramids, has followed the trials and tribulations, the hope and the violence, the time of Mubarak and the looming future. Now, post-revolution, this is a story of a nation reawakening from decades of political, social and economic repression.

 

Honorable Mentions

Ryan Roco, Attrition of the Mind: The Psychological Effects of Burma’s Kachin Conflict; Sean Gallagher, A Fragile State: Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau; Sitthixay Ditthavong, The Silent Siege (Kachin State, Myanmar); TJ Watt, Northern Vancouver Island’s Endangered Ancient Forests; Sven Zellner, Nomadic Children’s Bitter Fate (Mongolia); Stephen Boyle, After Conflict: A Hope (Mogadishu); Roberto (Bear) Guerra, La Carretera: Life Along Peru’s Inter-Oceanic Highway; Neil Ever Osborne, The Black Turtle Project (Baja California).


The Photocrati Fund, a $5000 grant to support an environmental or humanitarian photography project, is offered to one photographer each year. The aim is to invest in photographers who will have a long-term positive impact. Our goal is to identify outstanding, photographers and to provide the resources necessary to pursue projects that will have a tangible and positive effect on the world. The 2013 Photocrati Fund competition will begin in November 2012 and will run through April 2013. For more details please see the Photocrati Fund webpage.

 

2012 Photocrati Fund Announcement Coming Soon!

It has been a busy summer for the Photocrati Fund judges and the Photocrati staff. We apologize for our delay, but we are excited that the 2012 Photocrati Fund Fellow has been determined. Stay tuned ~ our video announcement should be posted soon!

Update from Paul Colangelo, 2011 Photocrati Fund Winner

Here’s an update on Paul Colangelo, the 2011 Photocrati Fund winner. Here, we highlight a small selection of images from his work in the Sacred Headwaters region of British Columbia. The full photo essay is currently embargoed until publication by a major news outlet later this year. We can’t reveal anything about that just yet, but trust us, it is very exciting! Stay tuned for another update and a complete photo essay by this incredibly talented young photographer. 

 

The Stikine River flows in the Grand Canyon of the Stikine, Stikine Plateau, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

Tucked into the mountainous folds of remote northwestern British Columbia, lies Todagin Mountain, home to what is thought to be the largest lambing herd of Stone’s sheep in the world. Never leaving the windswept grassy plateau of Todagin, the herd shifts between seasonal ranges across the mountain. Todagin has been the sheep’s sanctuary since the local Tahltan people can remember. Todagin falls within the Sacred Headwaters, a region that members of the Tahltan have been fighting to protect since coming under threat of numerous mining proposals.

Recognizing the value of the herd, the government of British Columbia protected its winter range via the creation of the Todagin South Slope Provincial Park in 2001. Since then, however, it has issued drilling permits for nearly the entire plateau, encompassing the herd’s spring, summer and fall ranges. If this land is mined, the herd will lose the majority of its habitat and could be forced off the only home it has known.

A small boat on Ealue Lake after sunset, Stikine Plateau, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

Graveyard overlooking the Stikine River, Telegraph Creek, Tahltan First Nation, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

Mountain goats, Grand Canyon of the Stikine, British Columbia, © Paul Colangelo 2010

Tributaries of the upper Klappan River, Skeena Mountains, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

While working on Sacred Headwaters, a book by Wade Davis aimed at raising awareness of the region, I initially camped on Todagin for a week to photograph the herd. I witnessed first-hand that the mining tenure squarely overlaps the herd’s habitat. Two issues needed to be addressed: a lack of scientific knowledge on the herd, and a lack of public awareness of land use plans on this remote plateau.

Teaming up with Dr. Wes Sechrest, Chief Scientist at Global Wildlife Conservation, and Wade Davis, we launched a two-pronged project: gain knowledge of the herd by mapping its movements across the plateau, and raise awareness of the issue through popular media.

In summer 2011, I was dropped off by helicopter with enough gear and supplies to live with the herd for four months. Completely isolated, I plotted the herd’s movements with specialized camera equipment and photographed the sheep with the aim of telling their story. By three weeks I was immersed in the rhythms of the herd and awoke to the subtleties of the plateau.

Weather proved to be the main challenge. It was officially the worst summer of weather in 50 years in British Columbia. The first windstorm sent tents and gear flying a mile down a valley and crashing into cliffs. The second windstorm occurred in late September, when there was half a foot of snow on the ground. It was so violent that it blocked highways 3,000 feet below me with felled trees and mudslides. I was evacuated by helicopter and had to finish the season a month early.

I will return to Todagin this summer and fall to complete the project, which becomes increasingly more urgent as development continues to ramp up. Images will be released upon publication of the story.

As a business student heading towards a corporate life, my life changed when I received my first camera as a graduation gift. Within months of my first picture, I left my job to pursue a life in photography. It was while working for Frans Lanting that I realized the power of storytelling and dedicated my life to telling stories of wildlife, environmental issues and the crossroads of culture and our natural world.

A grizzly bear chases salmon in a tributary of the Nass River, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

Eulachon left to decompose in front of a cabin before being processed into an oil known as “eulachon grease”, Nisga’a First Nation, Nass River, British Columbia

Salmon hanging in a Tahltan smokehouse on the Stikine River, Tahltan Nation, British Columbia © Paul Colangelo 2012

 

A young Tahltan girl beats a drum during celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the Tahltan Declaration, Telegraph Creek, Tahltan Nation, British Columbia

 

2012 Photocrati Fund Top 25 Finalists

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The 2012 Photocrati Fund judging is still underway, and we don’t envy the task at hand. With more than 400 talented applicants, selecting a winner is a tough challenge. Our staff and judges have enjoyed reading about the many meaningful projects, and more than that, we’ve loved checking out the outstanding photography. It is one of our favorite times of the year — a chance to be inspired by all of the great work that so many of you are doing in the field. That said, the pool is presently whittled down to the top 25 finalists for this year’s fund. Here they are:

2012 Photocrati Fund Top 25 Finalists

AMI VITALE
Kashmir: Paths to Peace

ANNA BOYIAZIS
AIDS Orphans in Sub-Saharan Africa

CAROL ALLEN STOREY
The RED Badges of Courage (Tanzania)

DAN GIANNOPOULOS
The Orphaned Elderly of Kathmandu

EDUARDO DIAZ
The Timber Mafia (Pakistan)


EMILIANO J. THIBAUT
The Written-Off  Future (Jalisco, Mexico)


JAMES VYBIRAL
Where Have All the Hunters Gone? (Peruvian Amazon)

KASPER NYBO
Borderline Living. Refugees in Lebanon

KHALED HASAN

Terror Beat of Acid (Bangladesh)

LAURA EL-TANTAWY

In the Shadow of the Pyramids (Egypt)


LIANNE MILTON
Social Impact of Post-Civil War Violence in Guatemala

MALIN FEZEHAI

Invisible Women (Beruit, Lebanon)


NEIL EVER OSBORNE
The Black Turtle Project (Baja California)

PETER DiCAMPO
Life Without Lights (Uganda)

ROBERTO (BEAR) GUERRA
La Carretera: Life Along Peru’s Inter-Oceanic Highway


RYAN ROCO

Attrition of the Mind: They Psychological Effects of Burma’s Kachin Conflict

SANDRA ELENA TEN ZIJTHOFF

Columbian Urban Refugees in Ecuador

SEAN GALLAGHER

A Fragile State: Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau


SITTHIXAY DITTHAVONG
The Silent Siege (Kachin State, Myanmar)

STEPHEN BOYLE
After Conflict: A Hope (Mogadishu)

SVEN ZELLNER
Nomadic Children’s Bitter Fate (Mongolia)

TJ WATT
Northern Vancouver Island’s Endangered Ancient Forests

TUDOR VINTILOIU
Huaorani – Forest People of Ecuador

VIVEK SINGH
The Brus – Displaced and Desolate (India)


WENDY MARIJNISSEN

The Dai’


 

Photocrati Fund Grant Competition Deadline Extended until April 4!

If you are an environmental, wildlife or humanitarian photographer, and you haven’t submitted your application to the 2012 Photocrati Fund grant competition, you have a few more days! We have just extended the deadline until Wednesday, April 4, 2012 (11:59pm Mountain Standard Time). The Photocrati Fund is a $5,000 grant for a photographer to undertake an important environmental, wildlife or humanitarian project. It’s judged by some of the best photographers in the world.

Check out the Photocrati Fund page for submission guidelines. And be sure to have a look at the cool video of last year’s Photocrati Fund winner and top finalists.

$5000 Grants for Photographers: The 2012 Photocrati Fund Competition is Now Open!

The Photocrati Team is happy to announce that the 2012 Photocrati Fund is now open! The Photocrati Fund offers $5,000 grants to photographers working on important humanitarian or environmental photography projects. For more details, visit the Photocrati Fund page:

www.photocrati.com/photocrati-fund

The Photocrati Fund, now in its third year, is one of the rare options today for upfront funding of photography projects. It also means great exposure – the judges are some of the best known environmental and humanitarian photographers in the world, and the winner is announced in front of a audience of prominent photographers and editors at the Look3 Festival each year.

Take a look at the 2011 winner and top finalists:

View it in full resolution here.

The Photocrati Fund is one of the most exciting and satisfying things we do each year. It’s deeply personal for me, because I still remember slogging in poverty through Southeast Asia, covering things like illegal logging in Borneo and various humanitarian disasters. I know a lot of dedicated photographers are out there doing the same thing today. Funding for such undertakings has always been sparse, but with changes and financial challenges in the media business, finding project funding outside of a few grants has become almost impossible. That is one of the key reasons that we remain committed to supporting great photographers doing important work.

Please consider applying, or to pass the word along to other photographers you know who are working on important environmental or humanitarian projects!

Erick Danzer is Founder & CEO of Photocrati Media.

Announcing the 2011 Photocrati Fund Winner and Top Finalists

Photocrati is proud to announce the 2011 Photocrati Fund winner and top finalists. We had a wonderful time catching up with industry leaders and photographers at this year’s fabulous LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, Virginia. And we’re very grateful to our judges for continuing to support the photography community through their efforts with Photocrati: Jim Brandenburg, Michael “Nick” Nichols and Steve McCurry. With more than 400 applicants to the grant this year, competition was fierce and judging was a challenge.

View it in full resolution here.

2011 PHOTOCRATI FUND RESULTS

Paul Colangelo ~ 2011 Photocrati Fund Fellow

Surviving Todagin ~ Paul Colangelo — the 2011 Photocrati Fund Fellow — will lead a four-month-long expedition on Togadin Mountain in the Sacred Headwaters region of British Columbia (June-Sept. 2011) to document the unfolding story of the conflict between development, conservation and livelihoods. Surviving Togadin, part of the Sacred Headwaters, Sacred Journey endeavor, focuses on the world’s largest herd of Stone sheep, their endangered habitat and the Tahltan First Nations people who depend on these animals. The expedition team includes: Dr. Wes Sechrest from Global Wildlife Residence, Dr. Wade Davis, National Geographic Explorer in Residence, and photographer Paul Colangelo.

Robin Hammond ~ Second Place

Still Human – Mental Health in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Struggle for Dignity ~ In most African countries, there is little, or no, provision for mental health. Where facilities exist, they are often woefully inadequate. Mental health care conditions are often atrocious. Patients are caged in prisons, confined with shackles and deprived of dignity. This work aims to inspire change — a more humane and dignified treatment of mentally ill patients.

Matt Eich ~ Third Place

Sin & Salvation in Baptist Town ~ Separated and segregated, it’s a world away from the affluent neighborhoods on the other side of the tracks: with roughly 500 residents and 90 percent unemployment, poverty, crime, violence dominate– but so do beauty, poetry and music. This project examines the complicated legacies of racism and class disparities in a Mississippi Delta town. “There is no salvation in hanging out on the corner.”

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Anna Boyiazis AIDS Orphans in Sub-Saharan Africa; Stacy Kranitz The Island – Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana; Ivo Viktorov Danchev Saker Falcon Conservation in Central Asia; Wendy Marijnissen Every Woman Counts; Alex Masi War Defects: The Fallujah Legacy; Thomas Edwin Stanworth An Uncommon Faith; Sebastian Liste Vicario Sugar Cane, Slave Work, and Andrew Harrington Living with Lions.