10 Tips Supercharge Your Photography Website – Free eBook

We are happy to share the release of an eBook.  10 Tips Supercharge Your Photography Website is a free eBook with amazing advice from our friends.

10 incredible photographers shared their thoughts on how you, as a photographer, can improve your website.

10 Tips To Supercharge Your Photography Website

In the eBook, you will learn from:

  • Jamie Swanson
  • Andrew Funderburg
  • Angela Pointon
  • C.C. Chapman
  • Zach Prez
  • Brian Matiash
  • Chris Frailey
  • Justin Balog
  • Rosh Sillars
  • Jodi Friedman
“A highly informative book without being overwhelming. It’s back to basics for the modern age.” – Traci Law

“Great tips for photographers of all sorts – whether you shoot people, artwork, or landscapes, these website strategies will apply to your site.” – Aaron Hockley

“I am now working on a new, and better, web strategy after digesting these tips and tricks for a third time tonight!” – Chris Nitz

Learn more and download your free Photography Website eBook today.

Thanks for reading and enjoy the eBook,

Scott & The Photocrati Team

PS.  If you’re interested in contributing to the second volume of the free eBook, get in touch with us.

Full Disclosure

Michael “Nick” Nichols is the Editor-at-Large for photography at National Geographic magazine and is a founding member of the LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, VA. Photocrati welcomes Nick on his first post as a special VIP guest blogger.

This past October, I went to the Wildlife Photographer of the Year awards in London. My camera trap image of a black bear in the Redwoods of California had been given an award. Last year, my close friend and former assistant Steve Winter had won the big prize with a camera trap image of a snow leopard. We both have invested years in finding ways to make elusive, wild animals photograph themselves by crossing the path of an infrared beam, triggering a disguised camera nearby.

The awards are presented in the fantastic main hall of the British Natural History Museum, under the giant dinosaur; a fabulous setting with all the mood that a great award ceremony should have. This year the winning image was another camera trap image, an Iberian wolf. Iberian wolves have come back from the brink of extinction and this image had the added energy of the wolf jumping over a fence. I was stunned by the image and immediately asked to meet the photographer.

VIEW THE “STORY BOOK WOLF” IMAGE HERE

Jose Luis Rodriguez was gracious and told me he had made the image over many months and many failed attempts by making an arrangement with a sheep farmer. He relayed that he had put “bait” carcasses inside the vacant sheep paddock for many nights while he attempted to get the image he had dreamed of. It is a perfect image. The wolf is in mid-air at exactly the right point. This is very hard to do with camera traps because the beam and the speed of the animal give results that are not perfect. Remember, the photographer cannot be there to adjust anything and most wild animals do not come back and do the same thing twice.I have a well-known image of a wild tiger jumping from a cliff directly into the camera. I got one frame in three months. One.

Leaping Tiger

The jumping Iberian wolf image seemed impossible, but I accepted it because I was proud of the photographer for disclosing that he had “baited” the animal. [Read more...]

Technology doesn’t define us…

…but it is a part of our identity.

I got my first job in this business because the photographer that hired me didn’t understand the concepts behind digital imaging. He knew f/stops and shutter speeds and watt/seconds like the back of his hand. He could estimate flash exposure (without a meter) within half a stop, and his client relation skills were out of this world. But he had just mortgaged his house to buy a digital camera (Kodak DCS460) and he needed help.

That was 15 years ago. Digital imaging was just beginning to become an acceptable alternative to film for some uses. Royalty free stock photography had just entered the market and pulled the rug out from under a lot of photographers. The global economy was finally starting to come out of a recession. Fifteen years later – we’re (hopefully) coming out of recession, microstock has showed up, pulling the rug out from a lot of photographers, and integrated video is once again, to use a phrase from the ’90’s, shifting the paradigm.

Looking at the past few years, newspapers and magazines have struggled horribly as advertisers have cut back ad budgets and shifted to digital marketing. It’s pretty likely that advertising supported print publications are not long for this world. Second, recent product prototypes by publishers like Conde Nast© and Time/Warner show that e-readers are coming fast. And if Apple launches the iSlate (or whatever they decide to call it,) later this month as predicted, and it’s the game changer it’s expected to be, it’s entirely possible that the newsstand and bookstore as we know it are headed the way of Betamax and CD’s. Right now publishers are simply converting their print publications to electronic versions. But that’s soon to change. Audio and video embedded into magazine, book and newspaper articles are only a software upgrade away.

Those photographers outside of the commercial field are by no means exempt. Moving pictures embedded into family snapshots (a la Harry Potter) are currently technologically possible, but economically unfeasible – and we all know how that curve works. Wedding and event photographers are already combining their stills into slide show movies with transitions and background music. Making the jump to embedded video is a logical next step.

As with any monumental change, there will be those who resist, those who adopt early, and those who go with the flow. It’s probably too late to be in on the early adopter phase, but it’s certainly never too late to be a resistor. After all, there are those of us who still shoot film, and are sought out because of it. There are those who make images using oils and watercolors and etchings, and make livings doing so. I expect that there will always be those who make a living exclusively doing still images with a camera, but they’ll be a minority. What’s left is the middle ground of going with the flow. Usually, it’s said, that standing in the middle of the road is a good way to get run over, and it’s true. But what may be worse is not crossing the road in the first place.

A lot of the skills that we’ve learned as still photographers translate to video very well. Composition, lighting and attention to detail are still important. New skills like capturing quality audio, maintaining continuity and compression codecs steepen the learning curve – so get on it and learn. As with still photography, specialized help is needed in some instances. We hire food, makeup and prop stylists all the time in the still world. It’s no different in the motion world, other than you need more people. Freelance editors, script supervisors, line producers and audio technicians may come into play.

ASMP has just published the results of their research here. It’s well worth reading.

Fifteen years ago I got my start because an industry veteran realized that he knew a lot, but didn’t know enough. So he hired some help. That’s a lesson worth taking to heart. We know a lot, but we need to know more. Either learn, hire some help, or get run over.

Hey, photography is legal, how about that!

Anyone who’s ever tried to do some serious photography in public places has had to deal with curious, and on occasion, concerned people interested in what you’re doing. At times some of those interested parties have badges, whether official government badges, or private security badges. Sometimes those badges come with demands that you stop shooting, explain yourself, move on, hand over images, get on the ground, etc. [Read more...]

PMA 2009: Great New Photo Equipment

Peter Burian reports on the best of the new gear at the Photo Marketing Association’s extravaganza in sunny Las Vegas, Nevada

The largest annual photographic trade show in the world, PMA 2009 was held in Las Vegas, Nevada in March. While touring the show floor and meeting with exhibitors, it quickly became clear that many were aggressively developing their line of cameras. As usual, a vast range of compact models were announced, many with HD video modes and more “intelligent” automation than in the past. I found fewer digital SLR models than expected, but two companies showed interchangeable lens cameras without a reflex mirror and these are just as versatile. In this report, I’ll briefly cover the most significant cameras (including two DSLRs announced shortly after the PMA event) and lenses as well as the most significant new printers.

Held in Las Vegas earlier this spring, the Photo Marketing Association's annual trade show attracted numerous retailers who wanted to check out the latest equipment.

Held in Las Vegas earlier this spring, the Photo Marketing Association's annual trade show attracted numerous retailers who wanted to check out the latest equipment.

[Read more...]